Indigenous Peoples Weekend

October 7, 2017 - 10:00 am to October 9, 2017 - 5:00 pm
Museum of the American Revolution

Activities in Patriots Gallery are free with Museum admission. October 7th-8th, the Museum is open until 6:00 p.m. On October 9th, the Museum will close at 5:00 pm. 
Tickets to the Film Premiere and Panel Discussion can be purchased here

Saturday, Oct. 7

Wampum Chronicles: Historical Narratives 
Patriots Gallery
11:00 am

Darren Bonaparte, a member of the Mohawk community of Ahkwesáhsne, will perform Wampum Chronicles, a colorful presentation on Native American history and culture in which he employs more than two dozen replica wampum belts and strings in addition to clothing and items specific to the colonial era. 

A Storytelling Bird: The Life of Colonel Louis Cook, Warrior of the Revolution
Patriots Gallery
2:00 pm

Darren Bonaparte, a member of the Mohawk community of Ahkwesáhsne, will give a presentation on the life of Colonel Louis Cook, the highest ranked Native officer in the Continental Army. 

Throughout the Museum

In the Museum’s exhibits, visitors will explore the personal stories of the diverse range of individuals who were part of establishing our nation, including women, native people, and free and enslaved people of African descent. Visitors will expand their understanding of the “founding generation” as they listen as members of the Oneida Indian Nation debate whether to support the Revolutionary cause in an immersive multimedia gallery; climb aboard a privateer ship like the one on which James Forten, a free 14-year-old free African American boy, volunteered; and examine artifacts including child-sized slave shackles, an intricately carved woman’s busk (corset piece), and a signed 1773 volume “Poems on Various Subjects” by Phillis Wheatley, America’s first published black female poet.

Sunday, Oct. 8

Wampum Chronicles: Historical Narratives 
Patriots Gallery
11:00 am

Darren Bonaparte, a member of the Mohawk community of Ahkwesáhsne, will perform Wampum Chronicles, a colorful presentation on Native American history and culture in which he employs more than two dozen replica wampum belts and strings in addition to clothing and items specific to the colonial era. 

A Storytelling Bird: The Life of Colonel Louis Cook, Warrior of the Revolution
Patriots Gallery
2:00 pm

Darren Bonaparte, a member of the Mohawk community of Ahkwesáhsne, will give a presentation on the life of Colonel Louis Cook, the highest ranked Native officer in the Continental Army. ​

Throughout the Museum

In the Museum’s exhibits, visitors will explore the personal stories of the diverse range of individuals who were part of establishing our nation, including women, native people, and free and enslaved people of African descent. Visitors will expand their understanding of the “founding generation” as they listen as members of the Oneida Indian Nation debate whether to support the Revolutionary cause in an immersive multimedia gallery; climb aboard a privateer ship like the one on which James Forten, a free 14-year-old free African American boy, volunteered; and examine artifacts including child-sized slave shackles, an intricately carved woman’s busk (corset piece), and a signed 1773 volume “Poems on Various Subjects” by Phillis Wheatley, America’s first published black female poet.

Monday, Oct. 9

A Storytelling Bird: The Life of Colonel Louis Cook, Warrior of the Revolution
Patriots Gallery
11:00 am

Darren Bonaparte, a member of the Mohawk community of Ahkwesáhsne, will give a presentation on the life of Colonel Louis Cook, the highest ranked Native officer in the Continental Army. ​

Oneida Indian Nation Dancers
Patriots Gallery
12:00 pm, 1:00 pm, and 2:00 pm

Dancers from the Oneida Indian Nation will perform traditional Haudenosaunee social dances, incorporating drumbeats and chants, in authentic dress in the Museum’s Patriots Gallery.

Film Premiere and Panel Discussion
Lenfest-Myer Theater
6:00 pm
$5 members, $15 non-members, $5 students

Join us for a special evening program, in partnership with the Oneida Indian Nation, that will explore how history is often oversimplified to remove nuance or omit inconvenient truths.  The program will begin with a screening of “People of the Standing Stone,” a 25-minute film narrated by Academy Award-winner Kevin Costner and directed by award-winning documentarian Ric Burns. The documentary traces the history of the Oneida Nation and how it stood in solidarity with General George Washington to help America forge its independence during the Revolutionary War.

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion entitled “Our Shared History: Lifting Up Lesser Known Stories of our Nation’s Founding.” Panelists include Kevin Gover, Director of the National Museum of the American Indian; Ray Halbritter, Oneida Nation Representative, Nation Enterprises CEO, and a Museum Board Member; and Dr. R. Scott Stephenson, the Museum’s Vice President of Collections, Exhibitions and Programming. It will be moderated by Sara Lomax-Reese, President and CEO of WURD 900-AM.

Throughout the Museum

In the Museum’s exhibits, visitors will explore the personal stories of the diverse range of individuals who were part of establishing our nation, including women, native people, and free and enslaved people of African descent. Visitors will expand their understanding of the “founding generation” as they listen as members of the Oneida Indian Nation debate whether to support the Revolutionary cause in an immersive multimedia gallery; climb aboard a privateer ship like the one on which James Forten, a free 14-year-old free African American boy, volunteered; and examine artifacts including child-sized slave shackles, an intricately carved woman’s busk (corset piece), and a signed 1773 volume “Poems on Various Subjects” by Phillis Wheatley, America’s first published black female poet.

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